Road tolls boom but effect on traffic congestion up for debate

Road tolls boom but effect on traffic congestion up for debate

Updated

A toll hike on the M4 near Melbourne’s Gold Coast is likely to generate a surge in traffic as drivers are diverted from the busy M1, traffic expert Professor David Smith says.

The toll, at the rate of between 4 and 5 cents, will run through the middle of the first week of November.

“If we don’t do anything, it’s pretty obvious that it would raise th안산안마 안산출장마사지e congestion which we already see and it would likely increase congestion in the surrounding areas,” Professor Smith said.

“I think the main question is whether the motorists get frustrated. In the last several years we’ve also had a bumpy stretch through some are코인카지노as — in the Sydney region — where the peak drivers have got bored, but that doesn’t mean there’s congestion on these stretch of the road.

“There are obviously certain areas where we have high traffic volumes because we tend to see very short periods of time during peak hours, but it doesn’t mean congestion is created just because there is a high traffic volume.”

Toll advocates say the toll hike won’t add to congestion in a busy corridor where the M1 is well traveled.

A study in 2009 showed drivers used around 30 per cent of the expressway to make their way from the Central Business District in South Melbourne to Sydney.

The study also found that the average peak hour traffic volume was 1.5 times greater in the vicinity of the toll than in the surrounding area, the Herald Sun reported.

But a Department of Transport analysis earlier this year found that, on average, each driver would travel around one metre closer to the A4 than the same amount of distance on the other side.

The Department of Transport report also showed that the average vehicle travel time from one toll road to the nex강릉출장샵t, measured in minutes, was 1.2 minutes less than a similar number of trips taking the same number of cars.

And research by the Victorian Government last year found that there were 17 toll roads across Australia that weren’t currently required to have their capacity inspected or that had no maintenance.

“That’s something that people could get a sense of when you’ve been a toll road customer in Victoria,” Professor Smith said.

“And that’s always been the case. You buy a road you have a high volume of tolls that you’re trying to manage and you’re not able to pay for any of it because the Government is not monitoring where the peak and normal drivers are on the roa